Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar
APUSH SYLLABUS

Advanced Placement United States History Syllabus

Course Description:

AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is meant to be the equivalent of a freshman college course and can earn students college credit. It is a two-semester survey of American history from the age of exploration and discovery to the pres­ent. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote consider­able time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed.  This course will focus on historical argumentation, chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, and interpretation and synthesis.  Students will develop the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U. S. History. Students will learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Students will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

Course Objectives

Students will:

·         master a broad body of historical knowledge

·         demonstrate an understanding of historical chronology

·         use historical data to support an argument or position 

·         interpret and apply data from original documents, including cartoons, graphs, letters, etc.

·         effectively use analytical skills of evaluation, cause and effect, compare and contrast

·         work effectively with others to produce products and solve problems

·         prepare for and successfully pass the AP U.S. History Exam


Course Texts and Selected Readings:

Kennedy, David M., Lizabeth Cohen, and Thomas A. Bailey. The American Pageant. (Boston: McDougal Littell/Houghton Mifflin, 2006).  (also includes ancillary materials.)

 

Kennedy, David M., Lizabeth Cohen, and Thomas A. Bailey. The American Spirit

            Volumes 1 &2. (Boston:  McDougal Littell/Houghton Mifflin, 2006).

 

The Americans.  Electronic Library of Primary Sources.  Evanston:  McDougal Littell,       1999.

 

Bennett, William J. America:  The Last Best Hope, Vols. 1and 2. (Nashville:  Thomas

            Nelson, 2006).  (CR6)  (Various selections used throughout course to supplement text and reader)

 

Clayborne, Carson, David Garrow, Gerald Gill, Vincent Harding, Darlene Clark Hine,

            Eds.  Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader.  New York:  Penquin Books, 1987. (CR6)

 

Crum, John W.  AP American History Test Prep.  New York:  Simon & Schuster, 1994.

 

Hymowitz, Carol and Michaele Weissman.  A History of Women in America.  New York:

            Bantam Books, 1978. (CR6)

 

Loewen, James W.  Lies My Teacher Told Me:  Everything Your American

          History Textbook Got Wrong.  New York:  Touchstone, 2007. (CR6)

 

Obst, Linda, ed.  The Sixties.  New York:  Random House, 1977.

 

The Vietnam War.  A Historical Reader.  Evanston:  McDougal Littell, 2000.

 

Tuchman, Barbara.  The Guns of August.  New York:  Random House, 1962.(CR 6)

 

Zinn, Howard.  A People’s History.  New York:  Harper Collins, 2003. (CR6) (Various selections used throughout course to supplement text and reader)

 

Numerous audio/video selections, articles, web searches and handouts

 

The APUSH Exam:   See--http://apcentral.collegeboard.com

The three-hour-and-five-minute exam has two sections: a 55-minute multiple-choice and a 130-minute free-response section. The multiple-choice questions are designed to test your factual knowledge, breadth of preparation, and knowledge-based analytical skills. The essay questions give you the chance to demonstrate your mastery of historical interpretation and your ability to express your views and knowledge in writing.

Section I: Multiple-Choice

There are 80 multiple-choice questions.  To score a grade of 3 or above, you need to answer about 60 percent of the multiple-choice questions correctly—and write acceptable essays in the free-response section.

Approximately 20% of the questions deal with the period through 1789, 45% cover 1790 through 1914, and 35% cover 1915 to the present including questions on events since 1980.

Within those time periods, 35% of the questions are on political institutions, behavior, and public policy; 40% are about social and cultural developments; approximately 15% of the remaining questions cover diplomacy and international relations; and 10% cover economic developments. A substantial number of the social and economic history questions deal with such traditional topics as the impact of legislation on social groups and the economy, or the pressures brought to bear on the political process by social and economic developments.

The bulk of the questions focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Total scores on the multiple-choice section are based on the number of questions answered correctly. Points are not deducted for incorrect answers and no points are awarded for unanswered questions.

Section II: Free-Response

The section has three parts. Part A has one document-based essay question (DBQ) and parts B and C each offer a choice of two standard essay questions.

DBQ

There is a mandatory 15-minute reading period at the beginning of the free-response section. Spend most of that time analyzing the documents and planning your answer to the DBQ in Part A. It's recommended that you spend 45 minutes writing the DBQ essay.

The documents contained in the DBQ rarely features familiar classics like the Emancipation Proclamation or Declaration of Independence, though the documents' authors may be major historical figures. The documents vary in length and format, and are chosen to illustrate interactions and complexities within the material. In addition to calling upon a broad spectrum of historical skills, the diversity of materials will allow students to assess the value of different sorts of documents.

When appropriate, the DBQ will include charts, graphs, cartoons, and pictures, as well as written materials. This gives you the chance to showcase your ability to assess the value of a variety of documents. The DBQ usually requires that you relate the documents to a historical period or theme and show your knowledge of major periods and issues. For this reason, outside knowledge is very important and must be incorporated into the student's essay if the highest scores are to be earned. To earn a high score it's also very important that you incorporate the information you learned in your AP U.S. History class. The emphasis of the DBQ will be on analysis and synthesis, not historical narrative.

Your DBQ essay will be judged on thesis, argument, and supporting evidence. The DBQ tests your ability to analyze and synthesize historical data, and assess verbal, quantitative, or pictorial materials as historical evidence.

Standard Essay Questions

You'll have a total of 70 minutes for the standard essay questions. It's recommended that you spend 35 minutes on each essay: five minutes planning and 30 minutes writing.

The standard essay questions may require that you relate developments in different areas (e.g., the political implications of an economic issue); analyze common themes in different time periods (e.g., the concept of national interest in United States foreign policy); or compare individual or group experiences that reflect socioeconomic, ethnic, racial, or gender differences (e.g., social mobility and cultural pluralism).

Although historiography is not emphasized in the examination, you are expected to have a general understanding of key interpretations of major historical events. Some questions are based on literary materials but the emphasis will be on the relationship between the material and politics, social and economic life, or related cultural and intellectual movements, not on literature as art.

Standard essays will be judged on the strength of the thesis developed, the quality of the historical argument, and the evidence offered in support of the argument, rather than on the factual information per se. Unless a question asks otherwise, you will not be penalized for omitting specific illustrations.

Scoring the Exam

The multiple-choice and free-response sections each account for one-half of your final exam grade. Within the free-response section, the document-based essay question counts for 45 percent and the two standard essays count for 55 percent.


Organization:

Reading assignments and discussion questions for each chapter will be required. Student led discussions and participation will be expected. Reading logs will be maintained per school policy.  

Test dates will be announced in advance and test format will be APUSH multiple choice. At the end of each nine weeks grading period a cumulative test will be given as well as an ACT Quality Core US History test.  DBQs and free responses will also be assigned periodically throughout the year and will be scored according to the 9-point rubric attached at the end of the syllabus.

Class will be a combination of lecture, group work, student presentations, coverage of discussion questions, and answer­ing student questions. Lecture will be interspersed with videos, power points, documents, graphs, charts, primary sources, etc. as relevant for each unit. Some activities will be completed via online sources.  Each lesson will be organized around “I can” statements related to the content and tied to one or more of the state’s academic outcomes.

At the end of the second semester, all students, whether or not they have taken the AP exam, will be required to take a comprehensive exam (the state exam/ ACT Quality Core) covering the entire year’s course. This comprehensive exam, which will be given a weight of 10% in computing final grades, will be given per school’s finals schedule.

 

Course Outline—Semester 1

Unit 1: Colonial History (3 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 1–6 and readings American Spirit, Chapters 1-6, “The Truth about the First Thanksgiving” (Loewen) (CR6)

Themes: (CR5)

1. The emergence of American cultural traits and the factors that contributed to them

2. Emerging regional patterns and how they evolved

Content:

Native American Societies/ Cultural differences between Americans and Europeans/Columbian exchange (CR 2)

Motives and methods of colonization: Spain, France, Britain

Push-pull factors bringing colonists to the New World (CR5)

Comparison/contrast of Southern, middle, and New England political, economic, social, and religious patterns (CR1,2,4)

Origin of slavery (CR6)

Colonial Wars and Colonial Unity (CR3)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Develop a chart explaining the financing, motivation for founding, and political, social, and economic organization of each area:  (a) the Southern colonies; (b) New England; (c) the middle colonies. Include identification as proprietary, royal or charter colony.  What elements did all these colonies have in common? What major differences existed? What accounts for the differenc­es? (CR1, 2, 4)

 

Map Activity:  On an outline map, label the areas settled by the French, English, Spanish and Dutch

Analyze Franklin’s Join or Die cartoon using APPARTS or SOAPS analyzing primary documents method (CR7)

DBQ: New England and Chesapeake Regions (CR7, 8)

 

Essay:  Analyze early American attempts at unification prior to the Revolutionary War. (CR8)

 

Multiple choice test

Unit 2: Independence (2 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 7-8  American Spirit Chapters 7-8

Themes: (CR5)

      1. Colonists reevaluate their relationship with Great Britain and with each other


 2.  The American Revolution as a conservative or a radical movement

3. The American Revolution’s place in world developments of the time period

Content:

Mercantilism—costs and benefits for Britain and colonies (CR4)

British policy changes, post-1763  (CR3)

Emerging colonial cooperation and decision for independence (CR3)

Military victory and terms of the Treaty of Paris (CR3)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

British Policy Chart: Create a chart detailing the various British policies enact­ed following the Seven Years’ War (Proclamation of 1763 through the Intolerable Acts). Indicate the content or provisions of these acts, the colonial response and the impact on growing colonial unity, and the impact of the experience on post-independence governance. (CR1, CR7) 

 

American Revolution Game:  Divide class into Colonists and British.  Each group has assigned resources, and must make decisions regarding purchases, battles, etc.

 

DBQ:  To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change American Society? (CR2,7, 8)

 

Multiple choice test

Unit 3: Post-Independence and the Critical Period (3 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 8–10 American Spirit Chapters 8-10

Themes:  (CR5)

1. Impact of colonial experience on post-independence government

2. Development of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights

3. The emergence of political parties and the factors that divided them

4. The development of sectional specialization and interdependence


5. The conflict between national power and states’ rights

Content:

Government under the Articles of Confederation—Successes and failures (CR 1)

Constitutional Convention (CR 1,6):  Personalities, Compromises, Controversies,

Ratification

Hamilton vs. Jefferson (CR1)

British–French conflict and its impact on American politics (CR1):

Trade (CR4), Diplomacy (CR3), Alien and Sedition Acts (CR3)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

 

Worksheet on Federalist Papers, No. 10 (CR7,6)

 

DBQ: Articles of Confederation (CR 7,8)

Free Response:  Analyze the ways in which the political, economic, and diplomatic crises of the 1780s shaped the provisions of the United States Constitution.  (CR1, 3,4, 8)

 

Multiple Choice test

Unit 4: Jefferson’s Administration/Growth of Nationalism (2 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 11–12 American Spirit Chapters 11-12

Themes: (CR5)

1. The peaceful transfer of power from one party to another.

2. Changes in party positions.

3. National growth and the growth of nationalism.

Content:

Jefferson’s “Revolution of 1800” (CR1):  Changes in Party Positions,

Louisiana Purchase

War of 1812: Causes, Conduct, Consequences (CR3):  Era of Good Feelings,

Rise of Nationalism, Diplomatic Achievements

Marshall Court rulings and precedents (CR6)

Monroe Doctrine (CR3)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Students analyze the major decisions issued by the Marshall Court. (CR 6)

Multiple choice test

Unit 5: The Age of Jackson (3 Weeks)

Readings:   Text, Chapters 13-15, 17; American Spirit Chapters 13-15, 17

Themes: (CR5)

1. The emergence of the second American party system

2. The emergence of the “Common Man” in American politics

3. Geographical and economic expansion

4. Reform movements and the American character.

Content:

Election of 1824 and the founding of Jackson’s Democratic Party (CR1)

Jackson’s Administration (CR1, 2, 3):  Spoils System, Nullification, Bank War,

Cherokee Removal

Manifest Destiny and the War with Mexico (CR3)

Immigration; social, political, and economic developments; and reform movements, 1820-1850 (CR1,2 ,4)

Major Assignments and Assessments: Groups research and present illustrated talks on one of the following social developments from the 1820s to the 1850s:

Scientific and technological developments


Transportation and sectional interdependence

Labor and labor organizations

Social reforms and reformers

Utopian societies

Religious developments

Immigration (CR5)

DBQ: Cherokee Removal or Reform Movements 1825-1850 (CR 7, 8)

 

Multiple choice test

Unit 6: Slavery and Sectionalism (2 Weeks)

Readings: Text, Chapters 16, 18-20;  American Spirit, Chapters 16, 18-20

Themes: (CR 5)

1. Sectionalism

2. Slavery

3. Causes of the Civil War

Content:

Slavery as a social and economic institution (CR 2,4)

The politics of slavery: (CR1)   Missouri Compromise, Abolitionists, Compromise of 1850, Kansas–Nebraska Act and Bleeding Kansas, Dred Scott Decision, Lincoln–Douglas Debates, John Brown’s Raid, Election of 1860

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Free Response:  Analyze the ways in which controversy over the extension of slavery into western territories contributed to the coming of the Civil War. Confine your answer to the period 1845–1861. (CR8)

 

Free Response:  Use TWO of the following categories to analyze the ways in which African Americans created a distinctive culture in slavery: Family, Music, Oral traditions,

Religions.  (CR8)

 

DBQ:  2005 Why was compromise no longer possible after 1850? (CR7, 8)

 

Multiple Choice Test

Unit 7: Civil War and Reconstruction (3 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 21–22, American Spirit, Chapter 20-22

Themes: (CR 5)

1. Secession and war

2. Reconstruction issues and plans

Content:

Military strategies, strengths and weaknesses, events and outcomes

The home front, North and South, mobilizing manpower, finances, public opinion,

social, economic, and political impact of war (CR1, 2, 3)

Presidential vs. congressional Reconstruction plans and actions (CR1)

Economic development: The New South? (CR4)

1877 Compromise and Home Rule (CR1)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

 

Map Activity:  Construct a map identifying Union states/ territories, Confederate states, strategies, major battles and dates, and results

 

Research:  Divide class into groups to identify documents relevant to the Civil War and Reconstruction era.  Students will use the documents to develop DBQs and accompanying rubrics.  Students will answer a DBQ prepared by a different group.  Groups will then score their constructed DBQ. (CR 1-8)

 

Multiple Choice Test

 

 

Semester 2

Unit 8: Rise of Business and Labor   (2 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 23–24 American Spirit, Chapters 23-24

Themes: (CR5)

1. Political alignment and corruption in the Gilded Age

2. Role of government in economic growth and regulation

3. Social, economic, and political impact of industrialization

Content:

Gilded Age politics:  (CR1)  Party alignment, Political corruption and reform

Industrial growth (CR4)

Government support and actions (CR 1)


Unions, leaders, methods, successes and failures

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Free Response: How successful was organized labor in improving the position of workers in the period from 1875 to 1900? Analyze the factors that contributed to the level of success achieved.

DBQ:  Organized Labor:  1875-1900 (CR4, 7, 8)

 

Multiple Choice Test

Unit 9: Urbanization and Immigration, Western Expansion, and Imperialism (3 weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 24-27, American Spirit, Chapters 24--27

Themes:  (CR5)

1.      The Rise of the city          

2.      The New Immigrants

3.      The Struggle for Equality

4.      The Great West and the Agricultural Revolution

5.      Expire and Expansion

 

Content:

1.      Urban problems and solutions (CR 2)

2.      Reactions to the New Immigrants (CR 2)

3.      Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois (CR1, 2, 4, 6)

4.      The conquest of the Indians and the fading frontier (CR 2)

5.      Populists (CR1)

6.      Annexation of Hawaii (CR3)

7.      Spanish American War (CR3)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

 

Free Responses: 1. Analyze the extent to which the Spanish-American War was a turning point in American foreign policy. (CR8)

 

2.  Identify and analyze the factors that changed the American city in second half of the 19th century.  (CR8)

 

3.  Analyze the impact of any TWO of the following on the American industrial worker between 1865 and 1900:  Government actions    Immigration    Labor Unions    Technological changes (CR8)

 

4.  How were the lives of the Plains Indians in the second half of the nineteenth century affected by technological developments and government actions? (CR8)

 

Debate:   Two groups to discuss the differing philosophies on solving the nation’s racial problems held by Booker T. Washington and W, E. B. Du Bois.

 

Multiple Choice Test

Unit 10:  Populists and Progressives (2 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 28-29; The American Spirit, Chapters 28-29; Hymowitz, Carol and Michaele Weissman.  A History of Women in America.  New York:  Bantam Books, 1978. (CR6)

Themes: (CR5)

1.      Progressivism and Theodore Roosevelt

2.      Progressivism and Taft

3.      Progressivism and Wilson

Content:

Urban middle-class reformers lead a call for change: (CR1, 2 4)

Muckrakers, Women’s issues and roles, Political corruption and reforms

Consumer and environmental protection, Business and labor issues

Teddy Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson administrations respond to Progressive movement:

   Open Door Policy, Teddy Roosevelt’s “Big Stick” Diplomacy

Roosevelt Corollary and applications

Panama intervention and canal building

Nobel Peace Prize

Taft’s Dollar Diplomacy

Wilson’s “Moral” or “Missionary” Diplomacy

 

Major Assignments and Assessments: 

 Free Response:  Analyze the effectiveness of Progressive Era reformers in addressing problems of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In your answer, focus on reform efforts in

TWO of the following areas:  State and federal government, the workplace, living conditions in cities. (CR 8)

 

DBQ: To what extent did economic and political developments as well as assumptions about the nature of women affect the position of American women during the period 1890-1925 (CR7, 8)

 

Multiple choice test

Unit 11:  World War I (2 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapter 30, The American Spirit, Chapter 30, Tuchman (Guns of August) (CR6)

Themes: (CR5)

1. The changing role of the U.S. in world affairs — from isolationism to world power

2. U.S. motives in World War I and post-war agreements

3. Presidential and congressional roles in policy management (CR3)

Content:

Reasons for new interest in world affairs CR3)

Neutrality, 1914–1917

World War I as a war to “make the world safe for democracy”

Various interpretations of U.S. motives in World War I

World War I at home:  Economic impact , Harassment of German Americans,

Women and minorities, Espionage and Sedition Acts, Business and Labor relations, Creel Committee—wartime propaganda

Treaty negotiations and Senate rejection of Versailles Treaty

Major Assignments and Assessments:

DBQ:  The Treaty of Versailles—Wilson’s Big Disappointment 1917-1921 (CR7, 8)

Free Response:  To what extent did the United States achieve the objectives that led it to enter the First World War? (CR 8)

 

Multiple Choice test

Unit 12: 1920s–1930s (3 Weeks)

Readings: Text, Chapters 31–33; The American Spirit, Chapters 31-33

Themes (CR5)

The Roaring 1920s

1.   The Red Scare

2.  Immigration Restrictions

3.  Prohibition

4. Scopes Trial

5. Revolution in manners and morals (CR 2)

The1930s:

1. The role of government in society and the economy (CR1, 2, 4)

2. Political realignment  

3. Human suffering and response to the Great Depression

Content:

The1920s:

Post-war recession and agricultural problems

Intolerance--KKK

Immigration  


Sacco and Vanzetti

Prohibition and Organized Crime

Jazz Age culture, Youth Rebellion, Literature of Disillusionment

Business growth and consolidation, credit, advertising

Harding, Coolidge, Hoover administrations

Scandals

Trickle-Down Economics (CR 4)

“Business of America is Business”

Boom and Bust in the Stock Market

Foreign Policy (CR 3)

The 1930s:

Hoover’s v. Roosevelt’s approaches to the Depression (CR4)

New Deal Legislation—Effectiveness and Criticisms (CR1)

Supreme Court Reactions and Court Packing Plan

Dust Bowl and Demographic Shifts (CR2)

Extremist alternatives: Coughlin, Long, Townsend

Political Party Alignment — the new Democratic Coalition (CR1)

Impact of the Great Depression on various population groups (CR2)

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Stock market simulation

Debate:  Hoover verses FDR—Solutions to end the Depression—Election 1928

 

Free Response:  Describe and account for the rise of nativism in American society from 1900 to 1930. (CR 8)

 

Free Response:  How successful were the programs of the New Deal in solving the problems of the Great Depression?  Assess with respect to TWO of the following: 

Relief, Recovery, Reform.  (CR 8)

 

Free Response:  To what extent and why did the United States adopt an isolationist policy in the 1920's and 1930's?  (CR 8)

 

DBQ:  Analyze the responses of FDR’s administration to the problems of the Great Depression. How effective were these responses?  How did they change the role of the federal government?  (CR7,8)

 

Multiple choice test

Unit 13: World War II and Origins of the Cold War (2 Weeks)

Readings:Text, Chapters 34–36

Themes: (CR5)

1. Foreign policy shifts

2. World War

 

     3.  The Cold War

Content:

U.S. response to aggression—neutrality legislation, Lend-Lease Act(CR3)

Pearl Harbor and U.S. response

Military Strategy:  Germany First, Second Front Debate, Island Hopping,

Atomic Bomb

Home Front:  Relocation of Japanese Americans, Women and Minorities in the Workplace, Demographic Impact

Wartime Diplomacy and Cooperation (CR 3)

Atlantic Charter (Compare to Fourteen Points)

Wartime Conferences

United Nations Founding and Participation

Splintering of Wartime Alliance and Adoption of Containment (CR3)

Berlin and German Division

Truman Doctrine

Marshall Plan


NATO

Korea Truman’s administration:  Fair Deal, GI Bill of Rights, Taft–Hartley Act, 22nd Amendment, 1948 election, Loyalty program

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Group debate and position statements on:

Reasons for relocation—national security or racism?

Decision to drop the atomic bombs—military necessity, nationalism, or Cold War diplomacy?

Map Activities:  Develop a map identifying Allied Powers and Axis Powers.  Locate major battles and include date and significance.

 

Using a world map, identify the areas where the United States was involved following the policy of containment.

 

Free Response:  Compare and contrast United States foreign policy after the First World War and after the Second World War. Consider the periods 1919-1928 and 1945-1950. (CR 8)

 

Multiple Choice Test

Unit 14: The Eisenhower Era to the Present Day (3 Weeks)

Readings:  Text, Chapters 37-42; The American Spirit, Chapters 37-42;

Clayborne, Carson, David Garrow, Gerald Gill, Vincent Harding, Darlene Clark Hine, Eds.  Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader.  New York:  Penquin Books, 1987.

Obst, Linda, ed.  The Sixties.  New York:  Random House, 1977.

The Vietnam War.  A Historical Reader.  Evanston:  McDougal Littell, 2000.

 

Themes:  (CR5)

1.  Containment (CR 3)

2. Struggle for civil liberties and civil rights (CR2)

3. Checks and balances at work in American politics (CR1)

Content:

Eisenhower’s administration

McCarthyism

Containment/ Massive retaliation

Highway construction

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

Warren Court

   Asia policies:

Korea

Southeast Asia — Geneva Accords and aid to South Vietnam

Peaceful Coexistence — Khrushchev’s visit

U-2 Incident

Kennedy administration

               Civil Rights Movement: Popular and government response

Peace Corps, Alliance for Progress

Southeast Asia military and economic aid

      Bay of Pigs and Cuban Missile Crisis

 

Johnson administrations

War on Poverty and Great Society programs

Counterculture and anti-establishment movements

         Vietnam War

 

Nixon/Ford:

Vietnamization


China and the Soviet Union policies

Detente

              Watergate/Resignation/Ford’s pardon

 

Carter:

Human rights policies

Camp David Accords

Panama Canal Treaties

SALT II, Afghanistan, and Olympic boycott

Iran Revolution and hostage crisis

 

Reagan:

 “The Evil Empire”

Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI)

End of the Cold War

 

George Bush:

            Persian Gulf War

           

Bill Clinton

            Post Cold War Foreign Policies

            Impeachment Trial

 

George W. Bush:

            Terrorist attacks

            War in Iraq

           

Barrack Obama

           

 

 

Major Assignments and Assessments

DBQ:  What were the Cold War fears of the American people in the aftermath of the Second World War? How successfully did the administration of President Dwight D. Eisenhower address these fears? (CR7,8)

Civil Rights Leaders and Tactics: Students read position statements by various civil rights leaders including Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., Jesse Jackson, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, and Elijah Muhammad. They describe these leaders’ philosophies, programs, and strategies for action and evaluate which policies were most effective and why. (CR7)

Free Response:  "1968 was a turning point for the United States." To what extent is this an accurate assessment? In your answer, discuss TWO of the following:

National politics    Vietnam War    Civil Rights  (CR8)

Free Response:  Discuss, with respect to TWO of the following, the view that the 1960s represented a period of profound cultural change. (CR8)

Education    Gender Roles    Music     Race Relations

2011 DBQ:  Analyze the international and domestic challenges the United States faced between 1968 and 1974, and evaluate how President Richard Nixon’s administration responded to them. (CR7, 8)

Multiple Choice Test

Pre-test review Activities (1 weeks) Crum, John W.  AP American History Test Prep.  New York:  Simon & Schuster, 1994.

 

  • Review content by major themes and eras
  • Review DBQ format
  • Review Free Response elements
  • Timed Practice tests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AP US History Essay Rubrics

http://shs.westport.k12.ct.us

Document Based Question Rubric

Characteristic

Score  8-9

87 or above

Score 5-7

77 or above

Score 2-4

67 or above

Score 0-1

66 or below

Thesis

Clear, well developed thesis

Contains a clear thesis with limited development

Lacks a thesis, or thesis may be confused or underdeveloped

No thesis

Understanding of the Question

Understands complexity of the question; deals with all parts of the question in depth

Limited or lack of understanding of complexity; may deal with one part of the question in some depth, or in a more general way

Ignores complexity; may deal with one part of the question, or all elements of the question in a superficial way

May simply paraphrase or restate the question

Analysis

Provides effective analysis of the question; some imbalance permissible

Limited analysis, mostly describes

Weak or inappropriate analysis

No analysis

Documentary Evidence

Effectively uses a substantial number of documents.  Documents supplement analysis and are balanced with outside information

Effectively uses someof documents; may only restate information found in documents

Poor use of documents with only brief citation or paraphrase; not enough documents used to support analysis

Almost no use of or inappropriate attempts to use documents

Supportive Information

Supports thesis with substantial, relevant information. Outside information is balanced with use of documents in the analysis of the question

Supports thesis with some factual information

Lacks supporting information, or information given is minimal

Incompetent, inappropriate responses

Grammar and Structure

May contain insignificant errors

May contain minor errors that do not detract from overall essay

May contain major errors

Contains many major or minor errors

Organization and Writing Style

Well organized and well written

Clearly organized and written, but not exceptional

Weak organization and writing

Disorganized and poorly written

 

 

 Free-Response Essay Rubric

Characteristic

Score  8-9

87 or above

Score 5-7

77 or above

Score 2-4

67 or above

Score 0-1

66 or below

Thesis

Clear, well developed thesis

Contains a clear thesis with limited development

Lacks a thesis, or thesis may be confused or underdeveloped

No thesis

Understanding of the Question

Understands complexity of the question; deals with all parts of the question in depth

Limited or lack of understanding of complexity; may deal with one part of the question in some depth, or in a more general way

Ignores complexity; may deal with one part of the question, or all elements of the question in a superficial way

May simply paraphrase or restate the question

Analysis

Provides effective analysis of the question; some imbalance permissible

Limited analysis, mostly describes

Weak or inappropriate analysis

No analysis

Supportive Information

Supports thesis with substantial, relevant information

Supports thesis with some factual information

Lacks supporting information, or information given is minimal

Incompetent, inappropriate responses

Grammar and Structure

May contain insignificant errors

May contain minor errors that do not detract from overall essay

May contain major errors

Contains many major or minor errors

Organization and Writing Style

Well organized and well written

Clearly organized and written, but not exceptional

Weak organization and writing

Disorganized and poorly written

 

 

Contact Us
Boyd County Public Schools
1104 Bob McCullough Drive
Ashland, KY 41102
View Map & Directions
Phone: 606-928-4141
Fax: 606-928-4771